Demographies of London: The younger ages

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London’s Demography – up to age 30


by Benjamin Hennig and Danny Dorling
So, what has happened in London in the noughties? Who has gone where, who as come in, going out just total numbers and then by age?

Almost 8.2 million people were living in London in 2011. Here is a picture of the capital of the Uk drawn with the boroughs sized by the number of people in each. The little map in the bottom right hand corner below is an equal land area map of London. Inner London is smaller in that. The little blue-green map in the top right shows which areas had the most people, a few of the outer London boroughs were most populous. But how have things changes to get us to this point?

Population Cartogram


 

Map of Borough Population

T his map shows the boroughs of London resized according to the total number people living there in the year 2011.

The total number of people represented in the map is 8,174,100.

The rank map shows areas ordered by the number of people in a borough as a share of all people in London in that year (going from yellow for the lowest ranks via green to blue for the highest ranks). The key map is a conventional land area map of London showing the boroughs in the colour scheme used in the main map.

Detailed map views:

Well, in a nutshell the East end grew the most. Here is the map of where the extra 1 million people living in London in 2011 as compared to 2001 now live. The next map looks a little like the map above, because it is generally where there already were a lot of people that more people squeezed in, but the little blue-green map shows you that it really was the East End which saw the greatest increases in population, so that when you look at the large map again you’d be right to focus your eyes there. However, not everywhere in London saw population growth. In one borough there was overall decline and so when we draw London sized by declining population we get a very strange map indeed.

Population Increase, 2001-2011


 

Map of Borough Population Increase

T his map shows the boroughs of London resized according to the total population increase there between the years 2001 and 2011.

The total number of people represented in the map is 1,002,246.

The rank map shows areas ordered by their change in share of that age group in a borough as a proportion of the total population in a borough in that period (going from yellow for the lowest ranks via green to blue for the highest ranks). The key map is a conventional land area map of London showing the boroughs in the colour scheme used in the main map.

Detailed map views:

We did you tell you it was odd. Here it is (see below). Only one borough appears, Kensington and Chelsea, because only that borough recorded and overall drop in population. Because it was the only borough to record a drop the little rank map (top right on the map) just shows it and it is coloured yellow as having the lowest rate of increase. It happens to be a negative rate of population increase. While London as a whole was growing in population by just over 1 million people, the Royal Borough was declining by some 221 souls (net). This may not sound a great deal, but even a small population increase would, in relative terms be very surprising in a city that has been growing in population so quickly and by so much. Something about the Royal borough has put new-comers off. We would hazard a guess that may be the housing prices, but you’d have to look at other sets of maps in this series to see that. For now let have a look at which age groups have experienced the greatest falls here and in a few other London boroughs, before looking at where all those gains have been.

Population Decline, 2001-2011


 

Map of Borough Population Decline

T his map shows the boroughs of London resized according to the total population decline there between the years 2001 and 2011.

The total number of people represented in the map is 221.

The rank map shows areas ordered by their change in share of that age group in a borough as a proportion of the total population in a borough in that period (going from yellow for the lowest ranks via green to blue for the highest ranks). The key map is a conventional land area map of London showing the boroughs in the colour scheme used in the main map.

Detailed map views:

A couple of boroughs have seen a decline in babies and toddlers, mostly in the Royal borough, but also nearby. Some 803 fewer here in 2011 as compared to 2001. But the pattern of where there are 3502 few children aged 5 to 9 is very different again.

Population Decline Age 0-4, 2001-2011


 

Map of Borough Population Decline Age 0-4

T his map shows the boroughs of London resized according to the total population decline age 0-4 there between the years 2001 and 2011.

The total number of people represented in the map is 803.

The rank map shows areas ordered by their change in share of that age group in a borough as a proportion of the total population in a borough in that period (going from yellow for the lowest ranks via green to blue for the highest ranks). The key map is a conventional land area map of London showing the boroughs in the colour scheme used in the main map.

Detailed map views:

And it looks a little like a butterfly! Or at least a very asymmetric butterfly (see below). Only a small fraction of these falls are in the Royal borough. Far more are out to the East and also South of the river. The river is carefully drawn on all these images to try to help in orientations as we and you try and figure out what is going on here. Later we’ll see just who has been moving in to take up the space of the children who are no longer living in these boroughs in such numbers, but first lets carry on looking at who has been squeezed out and from where.

Population Decline Age 5-9, 2001-2011


 

Map of Borough Population Decline Age 5-9

T his map shows the boroughs of London resized according to the total population decline age 5-9 there between the years 2001 and 2011.

The total number of people represented in the map is 3,502.

The rank map shows areas ordered by their change in share of that age group in a borough as a proportion of the total population in a borough in that period (going from yellow for the lowest ranks via green to blue for the highest ranks). The key map is a conventional land area map of London showing the boroughs in the colour scheme used in the main map.

Detailed map views:

Older children have been squeezed out of a mixture of similar places in the centre of London. There are fewer families which children living here now as other adults without children squeeze in. Kensington and Chelsea is again ranked as having the greatest decrease by these ages. You can tell that because it is shaded in yellow on the little map (top right on the following map), and you can work out which area is Kensington and Chelsea because it is always shaded the same muddy brown on all the large maps in the centre of these images, even as its shape appear to change beyond all recognition!

Population Decline Age 10-14, 2001-2011


 

Map of Borough Population Decline Age 10-14

T his map shows the boroughs of London resized according to the total population decline age 10-14 there between the years 2001 and 2011.

The total number of people represented in the map is 1,818.

The rank map shows areas ordered by their change in share of that age group in a borough as a proportion of the total population in a borough in that period (going from yellow for the lowest ranks via green to blue for the highest ranks). The key map is a conventional land area map of London showing the boroughs in the colour scheme used in the main map.

Detailed map views:

The map of decline in teenagers just shows that there are only fewer now in the Royal borough, so we’ll skip over that and turn instead to who is moving in.
Some 100,000 people aged 20-24 and, showing a very similar pattern, 144,00 aged 25-29.
But there is so much more to say…to be continued.

Population Increase Age 25-29, 2001-2011


 

Map of Borough Population Increase Age 25-29

T his map shows the boroughs of London resized according to the total population increase age 25-29 there between the years 2001 and 2011.

The total number of people represented in the map is 144,420.

The rank map shows areas ordered by their change in share of that age group in a borough as a proportion of the total population in a borough in that period (going from yellow for the lowest ranks via green to blue for the highest ranks). The key map is a conventional land area map of London showing the boroughs in the colour scheme used in the main map.

Detailed map views:

 



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